Why dry fire is important?

  • Instant Feedback in Practice
  • Don’t have a Licence.
  • Applying for a category H Licence.
  • Have one but don’t have a cat H firearm.
  • Using club guns till yours arrives.
  • Sitting on the fence!
  • Don’t want the responsibility of owning one?
  • Just want to be able to shoot targets and knock them down with the least amount of shots.
  • Can’t make it to the range as much as you would like?
  • Can’t afford all that live ammo?

Pro-shooter has the solution.

Dry Fire: The Practice for Pro’s not Just Beginnershttp://www.officer.com/article/10833448/dry-fire-the-practice-for-pros-not-just-beginners
The reason that dry fire works so well as a training technique is because recoil has little to do with your accuracy with a firearm.

Recoil does not kick the gun until after the bullet has left the barrel, therefore your aim determines where the bullet will go.

Heres is the link to see it live.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySO0EWIlOKc

In an interview with world champion marksman Robert Vogel, he was asked, “How often do you dry fire?” He answers, “In one form or another, just about every day. For sheer skill building I feel it has no equal. For every live round that I actually fire, I probably mimic that round eight to 10 times in dry fire.”

Here’s the article http://www.personaldefenseworld.com/2014/05/11-questions-shooting-pro-robert-vogel/

How often do you dry fire?

In one form or another, just about every day. For sheer skill building I feel it has no equal. For every live round that I actually fire, I probably mimic that round eight to 10 times in dry fire. It is human nature to fear loud explosions going off in front of our faces, and therefore flinching or jerking the trigger, especially during rapid fire, is all too common. We need to train our bodies not to do this in an environment where we are very aware of what is going on. This is where dry fire comes into play.

Link http://www.personaldefenseworld.com/2014/05/11-questions-shooting-pro-robert-vogel/

Here’s another article on the importance of dry fire:

http://www.officer.com/article/10833448/dry-fire-the-practice-for-pros-not-just-beginners

The US military, Police departments, and competitive shooters all use dry fire training to become better at hitting their targets. Dry fire training will help you to improve the fundamental skills involved in shooting a firearm. You can practice proper grip, trigger control, sight alignment and breathing techniques. It can also help you to overcome any bad habits you may have developed, such as the anticipation of recoil.

Pro-shooter makes dry fire practice more fun!